Commit to Avoid Over-Commitment…What?


You parents want you to bring the kids over and spend time with them. Your kids want you to take them to sports practice, school functions, their friend’s house, and everywhere else in the world. Your church wants you to lead a Bible study. Your neighborhood wants you to manage the HOA. Your school wants you help with the upcoming play. On top of that, your personal trainer wants you to hit all your sessions. Though the last one I mentioned gives you the strength and energy to do all the other ones better, it’s often the one that gets cuts, right? The demands for your time never seem to end.

The dictionary defines over-commit in 2 ways: “to bind or obligate (oneself, for example) beyond the capacity for realization” or “to allocate or apportion (money, goods, or resources) in amounts incapable of replacement.” Either way you practice it, you will add unneeded stress to your life. The moral is it’s ok to “just say no.” You don’t get time back, so decide on your priorities. Determine to do something very well instead of trying to do everything. If you try to please everyone, you will probably please no one; so step back, define yourself, and put your stake in the ground. The next time you are asked for time or money, you’ll know the answer. Success guru Jack Canfield has stated, “Few people can get angry at you for making and standing by a higher commitment. In fact, they’ll respect you for your clarity and your strength.”